John

Wieland

, Carnegie

, Pennsylvania

, United States

Posted on
2020-02-19 15:36:15
“I primarily fly helicopters at my local park. I have personally gotten 2 members of the community involved with the hobby through discussions of the equipment and flight demonstrations. I have a good relationship with the local police and government. I never fly over people. If there are people utilizing one of the adjoining fields then I limit my flights to those areas where there are no people. Since it is a park, I am often approached by parents with their kids. The mechanics and controls are shared with them in hopes of sparking an interest in a future pilot (either in the hobby or manned aircraft). I have concerns thatall model aircraft(multi-rotors, helicopters, airplanes, scale models, autonomous operations and commercial enterprises) regardless of their limitations and/or abilities are being all being lumped together. The primary helicopters I fly are 380mm, 500mm and 700mm (main rotor size). Each of them are flown line of sight. They do have sensors on them which report my altitude, battery voltage, and signal strength. These sensors allow me to keep tabs on the aircraft and provide warnings if get above the height I have set, the battery is nearing low voltage and if there is a problem with the signal strength being received respectfully. They do not have the ability to take control and correct an issue. They are an additional level of safety I have chosen to equip each aircraft with to protect my investment from preventable crashes. Full size manned commercial airplane and privately owned planes have different equipment requirements (flight data and voice recorder requirements) which is based on their size and operation. 14 CFR 119 specifies additional regulations that govern certain types of aircraft and operations, including larger private aircraft and commercial operations: 14 CFR 125 covers larger (airline style) private aircraft 14 CFR 121 covers the airlines 14 CFR 135 covers commuter and on demand (charter) commercial operators So it isn’t that private aircraft have relaxed regulations, it is just that they aren’t required to comply with the additional regulations that govern the airline and charter operators. In my opinion, This is how the FAA should view UAV aircraft. Those that are flown for commercial interests (delivery and autonomous flights) must have the ability to communicate with others in the airspace through the existing LANNC system. Additional real-time reporting of their position would be in the companies financial interest, therefore research and development of light-weight reporting/communication equipment would be pursued. An additional requirement of staying within “air highways” might also be considered to minimize the flights over and possible damage to personal property in case of a malfunction. Highest level of regulations. Those that are flown under commercial long-range FPV (mapping, search and rescue, wildlife management) must have the ability to communicate with others in the airspace through the existing LANNC system. Additional real-time reporting of their position would be in the companies financial interest, therefore research and development of light-weight reporting/communication equipment would be pursued. 1st tier regulations. 3. Those that are flown under commercial short-range FPV (news reporting, property assessment, commercial photographs) must have the ability to communicate with others in the airspace through the existing LANNC system. An additional safety person who can communicate with the pilot and keep the aircraft within line of sight is required. Required inspection/maintenance logging and pilot certification. Easily identify the pilot, through a vest or some other visual means. 2nd tier regulations. 4. Those that are flown under recreational short-range FPV (sport, racing, pleasure photography) must have the ability to communicate with others in the airspace through the existing LANNC system. An additional safety person who can communicate with the pilot and keep the aircraft within line of sight is required. During events the requirement for each pilot to register with LANNC would be waived if the event registers through the LANNC system. 3rd tier regulations. 5.Those that are flown under recreational line of sight (public demonstrations, sponsored events) must have the ability to communicate with others in the airspace through the existing LANNC system. An additional safety person who can communicate with the pilot and keep the aircraft within line of sight is required. During events the requirement for each pilot to register with LANNC would be waived if the event registers through the LANNC system. 4th tier regulations. 6.Those that are flown under recreational line of sight (flying club, park, hobbyist/enthusiast) must have the ability to communicate with others in the airspace through the existing LANNC system. An additional safety person who can communicate with the pilot and keep the aircraft within line of sight is recommended by not required. 5th tier of regulations. The LANNC system is available to all UAS pilots. Thee are several apps/websites, both paid and unpaid that are currently available. reporting who, when and where you will be flying is a minor step before begining operations. Currently since I fly in class G airspace. I cannot receive any authorization using the LANNC system. I receive the following response when I have tried to utilize the system. “Airspace Authorization is either not available or not applicable to this flight” With the increased possibility of commercial entities delivering packages and materials utilizing this technology on the horizon, being able to keep both the commercial entities investment and our hobbyist investment in our equipment safe by utilizing the Low Altitude Authorization and Notification Capability (LANNC) willl enable both to continue to operate harmoniously. Each tier 2-5 must follow the established minimum established safety guidelines in addition to the items listed above. Remain well clear of and do not interfere with manned aircraft operations, and you must see and avoid other aircraft and obstacles at all times. Do not fly over unprotected persons or moving vehicles, and remain well clear from individuals and vulnerable property. Do not fly in adverse weather conditions such as in high winds or reduced visibility. Do not fly under the influence of alcohol or drugs. Ensure the operating environment is safe and that the operator is competent and proficient in the operation of the sUAS. Do not fly near or over sensitive infrastructure or property such as power stations, water treatment facilities, correctional facilities, heavily traveled roadways, government facilities, etc. Check and follow all local laws and ordinances before flying over private property. Do not conduct surveillance or photograph persons in areas where there is an expectation of privacy without the individual’s permission (see AMA’s privacy policy). Any amount of regulations will not stop everyone. Despite having laws (“regulations”) and punishments against drunk driving, hunting out of season, murder and any other number of offenses. These offenses happen daily. The vast majority of UAS pilots follow the highest level of safety when operating their aircraft. The aircraft they fly and maintain are a significant investment and source of pride. If this hobby is over regulated the future of aviation itself is in jeopardy. If there is not something like model aircraft to spark an interest in flight and reasonable access to further that interest though building, maintaining, and flying models, the amount of individuals seeking employment in other field other than aviation will be the consequences.”
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