ifly*@*bal.net

, Ohio

, United States

Posted on
2020-02-22 11:49:47
“Flying matters to me because I get to take my innovative mind airborne that creates pleasure, challenge, accomplishment and relaxation that I cannot get in any other form of a hobby. I apply physics, put it into motion and enjoy safely finding the performance limitations of whatever aircraft I fly without danger to aircraft, myself and the public. I also find great pleasure in just cruising along less than half throttle while battling the subtle and sometimes not so subtle constant varying weather conditions. A one mile per hour wind change or wind direction change significantly has an impact on any UAV making flight a constant challenge just to remain on flight course and to maintain constant elevation. UAV flight is very rewarding when a pilot can successfully match these challenges. Flying also matters to me to make an impact on another human, being young or old, to teach the physics of flight and how to live within and overcome those limitations. Exposing a new person to model aviation is important to me as I get to share my passion for the hobby, the challenges that go with being successful in the hobby and spreading joy in fellowship. I greatly enjoy and appreciate my AMA flying club and it’s members. There is friendship and fellowship where we all get to share our passion for the hobby and work together to maintain our flying field. I also get the same rewards from attending an annual UAV international event that exposes me to new people and new hobby technologies in addition to the fellowship of flying together. I leave the event every year with new friendships, bonds and memories that I will never forget. Most of all, I get to spend time with family members that go to the airfield with me. I always get quality time with my wife, daughter and granddaughter every tine any or all of them go to the airfield. It is one of our most favorite outdoor activities as a family. The recently proposed FAA remote ID requirement may mean that I know longer can participate in model aviation due to increased expenses that will be required to meet the new rule and the effect on every one of my aircraft to afford additional weight that could drastically change the flight characteristics, performance and reduce the length of every flight. The proposed flight limitation ceiling on UAV aircraft will also have a significant impact on my participation in model aviation and limit my ability to fly certain UAV aircraft.You are virtually proposing an actual grounding of certain types of recreational UAV flying and /or proposing for pilots to fly these aircraft in a manner that is not the original design use making flight of these aircraft in the limited space you propose unsafe to operate. The most revealing part of the new FAA proposals is that the FAA is placing restrictions on the UAV pilots to create an airspace for a new commercial UAV system. I do not know of any other prior individual, business or organization that has mandated FAA to clear airspace for their proposed aviation industry. The Wright Brothers did not go to Kittyhawk to mandate the federal government to clear an airspace for them to operate in. I know of no other pilot nor aircraft manufacturer to mandate the federal government to clear airspace for them or their aircraft. Yet it is quite obvious to any person of average knowledge that is exactly what is being done today to the FAA. The commercial UAV industry is mandating FAA to create airspace for their future industry at the expense of model aviators. There is plenty of airspace above the recreational UAV airspace for the commercial UAV industry to fly in without creating danger to the recreational flight, private business, military and commercial air industries. Those industries can coexist without endangering each other but the problem is that the commercial UAV industry refuses to fly above the recreational UAV airspace just to save them money. Please don’t take away my quality time with my family. Respectfully submitted, William Skinner”
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