Doug

Fig

, Falls Church

, Virginia

, United States

Posted on
2020-02-19 11:44:41
“I got into FPV drones 4 years ago due to an interest in learning more about electronics. My career has been in building automation and construction. In an effort to learn more about micro controllers to help me in my career, I found that FPV drone flight controllers worked on the same language as Arduino micro controllers. Since then, I have been building my own custom drones and airplanes with parts I select myself. I have learned how to solder the electronics together and program the controllers. I have gotten my three daughters involved as well. They love to solder and have built a couple drones themselves. My girls also enjoy flying the FPV drones and traditional model aircraft as well. I really enjoy the time I spend with my girls teaching them about how the electronics of the aircraft work, along with the mechanical means of flight. If RemoteID passes as written now, I will not be able to continue enjoying this safe hobby with my daughters. I live within some of the most controlled airspace in the United States, the Washington DC metro region. My local RC club AMA field is 40 minutes away. When FPV was restricted within the SFRA a couple years ago, our field did not allow FPV flight. I had to drive an hour or more away to get to an area to fly FPV. RemoteID will make it even harder for me to fly due to the system being able to prevent the model from taking off. It is nice to visit a local park and fly in an area where people are not present. When flying my FPV drones, I am typically lower than the tree tops, usually just a few feet of the ground, where manned aircraft would not fly. If I hear a helicopter or small plane nearby, I land. I do not want anyone to be bothered or hurt by my flying an RC aircraft. I have ten FPV drones, six FPV flying wings, and two traditional model aircraft. I have parts to build several more. All of these models would have to comply with RemoteID. If I have to pay for a subscription service for each model, it would be too much for me to afford. It would most likely be extremely difficult or impossible to outfit each of these models with a location transmitter. The cost of the transmitters added to the subscription service costs would be way too much for me. I’d lose all the money I have invested in my toy remote control flying models. The remote control aircraft market will drop causing the values of these models to plummet. No one would want to buy my existing models as they do not meet the RemoteID requirements. I’d more than likely just throw away the thousands of dollars worth of equipment. I am a safe and considerate RC pilot. I teach my daughters the importance of safety and consideration for others. I have been flying safely since I started four years ago and will continue to do so. If RemoteID goes into effect, I will stop flying because I follow the rules. There are many people out there that will not follow the rules or simply do not know the rules. Just as people can get guns illegally and use them to commit crimes, people that intend to do bad things with unmanned aircraft will just not follow the rules. I suggest increasing the visibility of unmanned aircraft safety to the general public. Anyone can walk into an electronics store and purchase a drone, then fly it without even realizing the potential dangers. Have users pass an RC aircraft knowledge test. Continue to use the hobby pilot registration and 107 certificate program.”
Share on email
Share on print
Share on facebook
Share on twitter